Neuroscience and the glass onion

Neuroscience is tricky because just as the glass onion it consists of many interconnected layers.
 
Math
Physics
Chemistry
Biology
Psychology
 
A working theory of the brain has to connect all these layers in a satisfactory way and explain all human behaviour from the beginning of time to the present day.
 
The signal processing theories of the brain are actually really good so we already have theories to explain how information gets processed within the brain. We know how information enters the brain, the big question is, what happens once the information enters the conscious parts of our brain?
 
If you want to learn about signal processing theory of the mind and entropy you should read the best paper I have ever read in my entire life, The entropic brain, one of the best papers ever written (in my opinion).
http://journal.frontiersin.org/article/10.3389/fnhum.2014.00020/full
 
I’m currently doing some writing trying to connect the layers. My focus is on answering the question, what happens once information is conscious in the mind? How is perception, thought and actions shaped by stimuli in the conscious mind?
 
A simple explanation is, the information interacts with cognitive models in the default mode network.
 
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Default_mode_network
 
The cognitive model holds the mental representation of you and the world and are represented in biology through biological neural networks.
 
Based on the values of these models you get an output, that is either additional thoughts or actions in the world.
 
However this explanation lacks mathematical modelling of the neural networks and explanation for how neurotransmitters affect cognition.
 
If you want to help me out with this you are more than welcome.
 
I believe that every single human knows exactly how the brain function because we use the brain all the time! We just don’t know that we know, which is confusing. So all feedback is welcome.
 
To seek comfort in this hard task I always think of a quote regarding Richard Feynman.
 
Surprisingly, Richard Feynman wasn’t the type of physicists who liked to speculate. Instead he liked to work within the things that was understood and just understand it better than everyone else.
 
PM me and I’ll send you a link to the document.

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